Review: Station Eleven

In audacious, darkly glittering novel set in the eerie days of civilization’s collapse, Station Eleven tells the spellbinding story of a Hollywood star, his would-be savior, and a nomadic group of actors roaming the scattered outposts of the Great Lakes region, risking everything for art and humanity.

One snowy night a famous Hollywood actor slumps over and dies onstage during a production of King Lear. Hours later, the world as we know it begins to dissolve. Moving back and forth in time-from the actor’s early days as a film star to fifteen years in the future, when a theater troupe known as the Traveling Symphony roams the wasteland of what remains – this suspenseful, elegiac, spellbinding novel charts the strange twists of fate that connect five people: the actor, the man who tried to save him, the actor’s first wife, his oldest friend, and a young actress with the Traveling Symphony, caught in the crosshairs of a dangerous self-proclaimed prophet.


Sometimes terrifying, sometimes tender, Station Eleven tells a story about the relationships that sustain us, the ephemeral nature of fame, and the beauty of the world as we know it. 

 

This book was so amazing!

It followed several characters, and totally explored the dynamics in a new world. A world where the population is a fraction of what it used to be, a world without so much of what we take for granted.

Parts of this book read like a love letter to the human race, and how far we’ve come. It had a generally bittersweet tone, filled with nostalgia which I loved. The characters were quite interesting and well-fleshed out, though I found myself caring more about some characters than others.

Overall, a great read, I would have loved a sequel to it, but it does work well as a standalone.

Rating: 4.5/5

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